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MUSKETEER STORIES by Ted Anthony Roberts

 

New Menu Selections For Gascon Adventurer:

(LINKS IN BLUE ARE CLICKABLE!)

 CYRANO DE BERGERAC (poet, swordsman, musician)

MILADY (The Real Evil Agent of the Cardinal from the pages of History)

GATIEN DE COURTILZ DE SANDRAS (Author of the Memoirs of D'Artagnan)

RALPH NEVILL (English Translator of the Memoirs of D'Artagnan)

ACTUAL MUSKETEER LETTERS (A rare look into the Musketeer past)

DONAREE THE MUSKETEER (New Musketeer Novel by Ted Anthony Roberts)

MUSKETEER STORIES (Started novels by Ted Anthony Roberts)

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON (His views on Le Vicomte de Bragelonne)

 

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Swashbuckling Author - Ted Anthony Roberts!

Musketeer Stories by Ted Anthony Roberts

All written content by Ted Anthony Roberts is (c) Copyright 2006 The Swashbuckling Press.

 

 

 

MUSKETEER STORIES CONTENTS:

1. A Duel Between Two Friends

2. A Play at the Hotel de Bourgogne

3. Athos, Porthos and Aramis: A Three Volume Novel (Volume II. Porthos)

SCROLL DOWN TO READ EACH STORY:

 

 

 

A DUEL BETWEEN TWO FRIENDS

Chapter 1

 

On the first Friday of the month of August, 1629, at the gardens of the Luxembourg, a place that was designed for king Louis XIII.'s mother, and of which was a favorite meeting place of gentlemen who were bent upon settling their differences, was at this time arrayed with two swordsmen, who were strongly trying to make short work of one another. And, as the hot sun beat down upon them, for the afternoon hour was passing by two o'clock, they were inadvertainly cracking smiles, instead of gritting their teeth with anger. The youthful one of the duo, for by the looks of him he were but twenty four years in age, was no doubt getting the better of his older opponent, who himself was of an age of about fourty-five years, because at the passing of every other moment, the young man would seem to either give his opponent a scratch with his rapier, or send him sailing to the ground.

 

"Mordieux!" the older would merely say; then, while slightly dusting off his clothing, he would engage his offender with even more strength. But it seemed to do him no good, for the other had great advantage over his rival - no doubt from youth, but also, as judging by his agility, the young man was a master at the blade.

"So," said the young man to his opponent, while still attacking him with his sword, "you dared to laugh at my horse, did you?"

"You must admit, however," answered his opponent, "he was a unique beast!"

"Unique, indeed! But that is no excuse -I will have done with you!"

 

And, upon this last statement, he sent the older man, again, sailing toward the earth; but this time the older gentleman's sword promptly left his hand. The young man allowed him to run toward it.

 

After grabbing the weapon, the man said: "That was foolish of you to let me retrieve my sword, for this time I will not be so slow -I will have done with you."

 

And, indeed, as true as his word was issued, his sword started to attack the other with absolute fury. The young man was then forced to defend himself with even greater agility; both of them, despite the age differences, were masters on the sword in their own ways; but it would seem, considering the expressions that their faces were yielding, that one was trying to prove to the other that, despite these said age differences, they were indeed great swordsmen. But even though the needs of admiration was not wanting on either side, it would seem that both were more friends than enemies.

 

Again, the older man is thrown down, but this time receiving an even larger wound.

 

"I give." said he, panting hard, almost gasping for air.

 

"Three times we have fought, Rochefort," replied the victor, "and all three times I have been victorious. I shall probably kill you the fourth time." And he stretched out his hand to help him up.

"It would be better for both of us to stop where we are, d'Artagnan." replied the wounded man. "Vive Dieu! I have been more your friend than you think; for, after our first meeting, I could have got your head off by one word to the cardinal."

They then embraced, but with true sincerity, and without malice.

To be continued . . . .

 

A PLAY AT THE HOTEL DE BOURGOGNE

It being Saturday and d'Artagnan not wanting to return to his office on such a fine afternoon as this, he decides to walk along the Paris streets and give a few hours to himself. "After all," he says within himself, "the king and cardinal always require my time -1 need a little time to myself!" And so, on this enlightenment, of which he had enlightened himself, he cheerfully and boldly walked the streets, trying his best to keep his mind from state affairs - if, indeed, that were possible!

 

As he went along, he heard a noise come his way. And after a moments waiting, he could see the reason for this turmult: it was a group of peasants, and a few shop owners, yelling out loud that a sort of play was about to begin at the Hotel de Bourgogne, and that the admiral actor known as Montfleury was the performer.

 

Upon hearing this, d'Artagnan stops dead in his tracks. "Ah!" he says under his breath. "Montfleury. I have heard of this man; a splendid actor says the gazette. Perhaps I have found a way to spend my afternoon, and to escape the commands of his Eminence!" Upon this thought, he stops one of the men who were praising the well known actor to ask him at what time the play was to start, and at hearing that the destined time was at two o'clock, d'Artagnan quickly hastened toward the Hotel, for the anticipated hour was almost upon him.

 

As he approached the Hotel, he was slowed by the huge crowd that was gathered at the Hotel doors.

 

"Montfleury!" cried the crowd, madly rushing through the door. "We want to see Montfleury!"

 

"Please, one at a time, my good citizens." cried the porter, holding out his hand. "Fifteen sols is the price of admittance. You will all have a chance to enter."

 

Along the staircases stood several violinists, welcoming all with a sweet tune; and a few guitarist stand by them, accompaning the violins with soft strums.

 

By the time d'Artagnan reached the porter, a nearby clock struck the hour of two.

 

"Ah! Good day, lieutenant d'Artagnan." said the porter, upon recognition of the soldier. "Is not Monsieur de Treville accompaning you this fine day?"

 

"No, sir; he is hard at work at his Hotel, he has given me the afternoon off, and so I thought I would see just how good of an actor is your Montfleury."

 

"Well, monsieur, you will not be disappointed. You will have one of the best seats in the house. " He then turned to his helpers: "Show lieutenant d'Atagnan to a seat in the upper gallery."

 

"Yes, monsieur." said the young man, who was a boy of about ten years. He took d'Artagnan's hand and led him to his special seat. As he was sat at a good spot, d'Artagnan quickly took out of his doublet a small tip for the boy.

 

"Thank you, young sir." the lieutenant said, while watching the lad's eyes swell with surprise. And without a word, the boy ran back to the front doors.

To be continued . . . .

 

 
 

ATHOS, PORTHOS AND ARAMIS: A THREE VOLUME NOVEL

VOLUME II.: PORTHOS

Monsieur du Vallon is summoned immediately to the bedchamber where Madame du Vallon is lying; she is patiently waiting for death to consume her. He quickly advances towards her as fast as he can, and sees at first glance Madame lying silently and solemnly upon her death bed. As he reaches the head of the bed, he stopps all his movements and starts staring beneath him at the old and slightly shribbled lady who is his wife. Upon feeling his presence, she slowly opens her eyes and looks up at the giant, and uses what little strength she has to smile at her husband.

 

"Porthos," she says weakly. "My dear Porthos."

 

"Madame!" he exclaims, and immediately kneels down beside her, grabs her hand into his own, raises it to his face, and gently presses its vein ridden skin against his pale lips.

 

"Porthos." she says again, "I am about to leave you."

 

"Do not say such things, my love!" He urges her, as he slightly, and tenderly, presses her hand. And he begins to sob vigorously.

 

"And why deny it? It is true." she says, while watching him shed many tears.

 

"So brave you are, Madame." he expresses, with great effort.

 

"I just want to let you know, my dear, that you are free, and I give my blessing, to marry one of those Duchesses or Princesses who were so fond of you."

 

"Alas, Madame!" Porthos screams, as he continues to cry. "There were no Duchesses or Princesses in my life. Never have I ever told anyone these things, but those ladies were mere fantasies. I confess that you were, and still are, the only one I have ever loved. And now, if you die, a part of me will go on with you. Therefore, Madame, you must hold on; you are the only woman that will ever be in my life. I say again - hold on!"

 

"My dearest love." she says, as she tries her hardest to raise her arm and rest her hand on his cheek, but barely succeeds. He quickly grabs that hand, pulls it from his cheek, and places its palm on his mouth, and kisses it tenderly.

To be continued . . . .

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Product Details (From Amazon.com)

  • Paperback: 350 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace (November 30, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1449913172
  • ISBN-13: 978-1449913175
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds

 

READ WHAT OTHERS HAVE TO SAY ABOUT DONAREE:

"Nicely done. I really enjoyed the history in the introduction and the duel is well written. Best of luck with the novel!" ~ Author David Lee Summers, author of five books: Vampires of the Scarlet Order, The Solar Sea, and the "Old Star" science fiction series: The Pirates of Sufiro, Children of the Old Stars, and Heirs of the New Earth. www.davidleesummers.com

"Very exciting read! Felt like I was there witnessing the action!" ~ Candle Artist Jfay,
www.studio3bonline.com

"I really enjoyed the humour and really laughed, not at Monsieur de la Donaree but with Monsieur de la Donaree! I dont know if you wrote it in this spirit but if you had a bit of Molière in you, I would not be surprised! He knew how to study people and would turn situations into a comic play! I laughed out loud, this is a gem! Not only de la Donaree is a fine sword, he has also a fine nose when it comes to pinpoint personalities, I'm talking about the Inkeeper and his situation with the wife here!! The second part is indeed in pure swashbuckling spirit, in rhythm and enthusiasm! And the end is a cliff-hanger! The beginning is "cocasse" (funny) as they might have said then in Gascony, and witty! Indeed Alexandre Dumas had a sense of humour too and satirically created at least one of his character ( in another book) to a character made up by Molière in one of his comic play. And Molière also took his inspiration from Dumas' s Musketeers and "The Man in the Iron Mask." I liked it! I had fun while reading this chapter about Monsieur de la Donaree, as while following the spirit of the Musketeers you gave a contemporary touch to the text!" ~ Artist Nicole Marques,
www.myspace.com/nicolemarques

"Hurrah, Ted! I gleefully await the next installment! LOVE the romantic stuff! Bring it on! There are few things in this world I like better than a hot Viscount. Keep going, Ted! Bravo! Keep writing! I can't wait to read more! But it is par for the course as I am also a writer. Keep in touch!" ~ Author Genella de Grey, author of "Remember Me."
www.genelladegrey.com

"Wow - What a wonderful beginning. As a whole, you have a unique way of writing & you captivated me by a few sentences peaking my interest to continue. For instance: ...hazed by the early morning mist...I love it! I look forward to reading the next chapter. You've gained my interest. That was impresive & informative. You've still got the hook in & I'm dangling to hear more. Thanks for the sneak peak." ~ Aspiring Author R.F.Taylor: Rianna

"Well done. Chapter One entices the reader craving more. I will look for The Adventures of Monsieur de La Donaree the Musketeer on the web. Keep up the excellent writing..." ~
Ferf